Posts tagged occupy wall street

win-win:

cultureofresistance:

Scales continue to tip in the rich’s favor the world around.
Income inequality — the gap between a society’s richest members and its poorest — is rising not only in the United States but in most of the world’s major economies, according to a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
Since 1985, income inequality has grown more pronounced in 17 of the 22 countries for which the OECD has long-term data, including Mexico, Italy, Japan, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.
The OECD’s report suggests an explanation for why the Occupy Wall Street movement has grown from a single protest site in New York’s Zuccotti Park to a global phenomenon with hundreds of chapters in dozens of countries. Among other things, protesters in the Occupy movement say they oppose the concentration of wealth in the hands of fewer and fewer people.
In the United States, the incomes of the very highest earners have grown by leaps and bounds over the last quarter century, while remaining more or less flat for the vast majority of the population.
Comparable growth in the wealth gap has taken place in Germany, Finland, Israel, Sweden, Luxembourg and New Zealand, according to the OECD. Only five countries — Greece, Turkey, France, Belgium and Hungary — saw their levels of income inequality decline or remain constant.
Income inequality has been linked to a number of troubling economic trends, and some analysts believe the wealth gap is contributing to the slow rate of recovery for the global economy.
Earlier this year, a study in the newsletter of the International Monetary Fund suggested that a country is more likely to enjoy a sustained period of growth if it has a relatively equitable distribution of income — meaning that for the wealthy, high-inequality nations named in the OECD report, bouncing back from the worldwide recession may be taking longer than it needs to.
Income inequality has also been cited as a catalyzing factor for a number of protest movements around the globe, including the riots in England this summer and the Arab Spring uprisings in the Middle East on which the Occupy Wall Street movement has been patterned.
An OECD press release notes that income inequality, besides affecting the wealthy member-nations of the organization, is also a major concern in many of the developing countries outside of it. The correlation between a nation’s wealth gap and its poverty and social and political instability was suggested earlier this year, when The Atlantic published a world map color-coded by inequality. China, Brazil, Rwanda, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire and Serbia all had high levels of income inequality — as did the United States.
—
Surprise, surprise.

*facepalm*

win-win:

cultureofresistance:

Scales continue to tip in the rich’s favor the world around.

Income inequality — the gap between a society’s richest members and its poorest — is rising not only in the United States but in most of the world’s major economies, according to a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Since 1985, income inequality has grown more pronounced in 17 of the 22 countries for which the OECD has long-term data, including Mexico, Italy, Japan, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.

The OECD’s report suggests an explanation for why the Occupy Wall Street movement has grown from a single protest site in New York’s Zuccotti Park to a global phenomenon with hundreds of chapters in dozens of countries. Among other things, protesters in the Occupy movement say they oppose the concentration of wealth in the hands of fewer and fewer people.

In the United States, the incomes of the very highest earners have grown by leaps and bounds over the last quarter century, while remaining more or less flat for the vast majority of the population.

Comparable growth in the wealth gap has taken place in Germany, Finland, Israel, Sweden, Luxembourg and New Zealand, according to the OECD. Only five countries — Greece, Turkey, France, Belgium and Hungary — saw their levels of income inequality decline or remain constant.

Income inequality has been linked to a number of troubling economic trends, and some analysts believe the wealth gap is contributing to the slow rate of recovery for the global economy.

Earlier this year, a study in the newsletter of the International Monetary Fund suggested that a country is more likely to enjoy a sustained period of growth if it has a relatively equitable distribution of income — meaning that for the wealthy, high-inequality nations named in the OECD report, bouncing back from the worldwide recession may be taking longer than it needs to.

Income inequality has also been cited as a catalyzing factor for a number of protest movements around the globe, including the riots in England this summer and the Arab Spring uprisings in the Middle East on which the Occupy Wall Street movement has been patterned.

An OECD press release notes that income inequality, besides affecting the wealthy member-nations of the organization, is also a major concern in many of the developing countries outside of it. The correlation between a nation’s wealth gap and its poverty and social and political instability was suggested earlier this year, when The Atlantic published a world map color-coded by inequality. China, Brazil, Rwanda, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire and Serbia all had high levels of income inequality — as did the United States.

Surprise, surprise.

*facepalm*

67 notes

Kachel had four hundred and fifty dollars from the sale of his copy of Final Cut Pro. For two hundred and fifty, you could travel to New York City on a Greyhound bus. He had never been farther east than Dallas, but New York City was so dense and diverse, and so full of ideas and ways to make money, that if he could learn to exist there he could surely find a place to exist. On the last night of September, he went to bed telling himself, “Oh, this is just absolutely nuts, you can’t do that.” He woke up in the morning with a clear thought: This is exactly what I’m going to do.

Kachel didn’t tell his few friends about his plan. But on the night of October 3rd, on a Wordpress blog that he had set up, he wrote, “About to board a bus to NYC. Not sure if I’ll ever come back to Seattle… . I have had some moments of panic, asking myself if I’ve completely lost my mind. That’s entirely possible. But those moments pass quickly and my sense of adventure takes over and I’m ready to hit the road all the more.” He had abandoned most of his remaining possessions; he was travelling with only a small duffel and a daypack, and they contained not much more than a few changes of clothes, a portable hard drive with some of his movies, and a “relatively stupid” cell phone with enough memory to send and download tweets. The bus left at midnight. At five in the morning on October 6th, Kachel arrived at the Port Authority bus terminal, in Manhattan. By 10 A.M., he had made his way downtown to the occupation.

53 notes

crosscrowdedrooms:

Retired Philadelphia Police Captain, Ray Lewis, being arrested on November 17th, 2011 at the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in New York City.

29,511 notes

dnnyca:

pitchfork:

Radiohead have announced a few new 2012 European tour dates. Pro-Occupy Wall Street artwork by Stanley Donwood.

Radiohead for Occupy 2012.

dnnyca:

pitchfork:

Radiohead have announced a few new 2012 European tour dates. Pro-Occupy Wall Street artwork by Stanley Donwood.

Radiohead for Occupy 2012.

1,326 notes

carton-rouge:

84-year-old Occupy Seattle participant Dorli Rainey, pictured above after being pepper sprayed by Seattle Police on November 15th.
She later wrote about the incident:
“Something funny happened on my way to a transportation meeting in Northgate. As I got off the bus at 3rd and Pine I heard helicopters above. Knowing that the problems of New York would certainly precipitate action by Occupy Seattle, I thought I better check it out. Especially since only yesterday the City Government made a grandiose gesture to protect free speech. Well free speech does have its limits as I found out as the cops shoved their bicycles into the crowd and simultaneously pepper sprayed the so captured protesters. If it had not been for my Hero (Iraq Vet Caleb) I would have been down on the ground and trampled. This is what democracy looks like. It certainly left an impression on the people who rode the No. 1 bus home with me. In the women’s movement there were signs which said: “Screw us and we multiply.’”

carton-rouge:

84-year-old Occupy Seattle participant Dorli Rainey, pictured above after being pepper sprayed by Seattle Police on November 15th.

She later wrote about the incident:

“Something funny happened on my way to a transportation meeting in Northgate. As I got off the bus at 3rd and Pine I heard helicopters above. Knowing that the problems of New York would certainly precipitate action by Occupy Seattle, I thought I better check it out. Especially since only yesterday the City Government made a grandiose gesture to protect free speech. Well free speech does have its limits as I found out as the cops shoved their bicycles into the crowd and simultaneously pepper sprayed the so captured protesters. If it had not been for my Hero (Iraq Vet Caleb) I would have been down on the ground and trampled. This is what democracy looks like. It certainly left an impression on the people who rode the No. 1 bus home with me. In the women’s movement there were signs which said: “Screw us and we multiply.’”

9,180 notes

thenewrepublic:

Occupy the universities?
With the costs of a college education astonishingly high and youth job prospects incredibly dim in this economy, is going to college worth it anymore?
“The students in Zuccotti Park are right to focus on the injustices of  student debt: Many of them are indentured to the very banks that  destroyed the economy and along with it the jobs students need to pay  their loans back. The banks were bailed out for their trouble, while  students are left with debt that, thanks to financial industry lobbying,  can’t be discharged in bankruptcy. Outstanding student loans in the  United States are projected to reach $1 trillion this year, a larger sum  than credit card debt.”
- Kevin Carey “Why Obama Should Pay Attention To Occupy Wall Street’s Critique of Higher Education”
Photo courtesy of Andy Wibbels.


I learn new things every day…

thenewrepublic:

Occupy the universities?

With the costs of a college education astonishingly high and youth job prospects incredibly dim in this economy, is going to college worth it anymore?

“The students in Zuccotti Park are right to focus on the injustices of student debt: Many of them are indentured to the very banks that destroyed the economy and along with it the jobs students need to pay their loans back. The banks were bailed out for their trouble, while students are left with debt that, thanks to financial industry lobbying, can’t be discharged in bankruptcy. Outstanding student loans in the United States are projected to reach $1 trillion this year, a larger sum than credit card debt.”

- Kevin Carey “Why Obama Should Pay Attention To Occupy Wall Street’s Critique of Higher Education

Photo courtesy of Andy Wibbels.

I learn new things every day…

2,466 notes

newyorker:

If Occupy Wall Street were happening in medieval times, you would get today’s cartoon of the day.


Somehow this cartoon seems very relevant in a Singaporean context.

newyorker:

If Occupy Wall Street were happening in medieval times, you would get today’s cartoon of the day.

Somehow this cartoon seems very relevant in a Singaporean context.

275 notes